Online stores are designed to allow shoppers to keep unwanted Christmas gifts AND issue them a refund

By Stephen M. Lepore for Dailymail.Com

Returning unwanted Christmas gifts is no longer just a buyers-only inconvenience, as retailers seem willing to cut the hassle and issue refunds even if they keep their products.

Returning a $ 50 item costs an average of $ 33, an increase of 59 percent from 2020, according to returns handler Optoro.

Tobin Moore, CEO of Optoro, claims supply chain problems and labor shortages are to be blamed.

According to the CBRE supply chain, around three in ten online purchases are returned.

Given all the problems and price increases, retailers are expected to pass the cost of returns on in higher prices.

The cost of shipping a $ 50 item back to a retailer could be as high as $ 33, an impressive 59 percent increase from 2020

The cost of shipping a $ 50 item back to a retailer could be as high as $ 33, an impressive 59 percent increase from 2020

Sometimes retailers like Amazon simply tell returns to keep the goods they don't want and still issue a refund because the return is too expensive

Sometimes retailers like Amazon simply tell returns to keep the goods they don’t want and still issue a refund because the return is too expensive

“The consumer pays the price for a free return,” Mark Cohen, professor of retail studies at Columbia Business School, told Today.

But sometimes retailers like Amazon just tell returns to keep the goods they don’t want and still issue a refund because it’s too expensive to return.

However, Moore says this is not an excuse to try the return system on more free items.

“There is a tracking function that determines whether or not consumers are using the system,” added Moore.

Online retailers usually work around the clock to ensure that the returned products are back in stock so they don’t have to discount their prices.

Online retailers such as Amazon increased sales 11 percent over the previous year during the Christmas season

Online retailers such as Amazon increased sales 11 percent over the previous year during the Christmas season

“The sooner you get good inventory, the more you can avoid haircuts,” said Moore.

However, these items returned to online retailers are often simply discarded, donated, or otherwise sold.

It was still a good Christmas season for retailers.

According to Mastercard SpendingPulseTM, between November 1st and December 24th they recorded an increase in sales of 8.5 percent compared to 2020.

Online retailers in particular benefited with an 11 percent increase in sales compared to the previous year.

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