More than HALF of women “had their periods and their sex life interrupted during Covid”

More than half of women experienced changes in their menstrual cycle in the first year of Covid, according to a study.

And the majority also suffer from decreased sex drive.

Irish researchers who surveyed 1,000 women believe the stress of the pandemic is likely to be to blame.

They said they had “unprecedented psychological distress” caused by the Covid crisis, aggravating anxiety and depression, and decreasing the quality of sleep, affecting reproductive health.

Health chiefs are currently investigating reports of tens of thousands of women in the UK having longer than usual periods after receiving a Covid vaccination. Some women complained of earlier or later periods.

A survey of more than 1,000 women conducted by researchers in Ireland found that women have reported more missed periods, worse premenstrual symptoms and lower sex drive since the pandemic began

British study examining whether Covid vaccines can disrupt periods “may not find anything because it’s too small”.

A UK study looking at whether Covid vaccines can disrupt periods may not find anything because it’s too small, scientists say.

Reproductive experts at Imperial College London are currently monitoring the menstrual cycle of 250 women before and after vaccination.

The lead researcher Dr. However, Victoria Male said the small number of participants means the study does not see a potential link unless it is “really common” – involving more than 1 in 10 women.

To prove a link, scientists need to disentangle normal period changes from those that may have been triggered by vaccinations.

However, with about 1 in 10 women experiencing period problems each year, which are often temporary, thorough research is needed to determine if vaccination is really to blame.

About 1 in 10 women experience temporary menstrual cramps each year.

However, vaccines and viruses are known to disrupt the menstrual cycle, although experts insist that they have no effect on fertility.

The study will be presented at the Society for Endocrinology’s annual conference in Edinburgh.

Researchers at Trinity College Dublin surveyed 1,300 women in April 2021 about their menstrual disorders – including irregular, boisterous, painful or heavy periods and premenstrual symptoms.

They also gathered information about their sleep quality, anxiety, and depression.

Around 56 percent of participants said their menstrual cycle had changed since the pandemic began.

The average cycle length (28 to 30 days) and periods (four to five days) stayed the same – but the number of days between women with the shortest and longest cycles increased significantly.

Meanwhile, nearly two-thirds said their premenstrual symptoms were worse, and 54 percent said they had decreased sex drive.

The changes were more common in women who reported mental disorders and poor sleep.

And the rates of severe anxiety, depression, and poor sleep were more than double those of pre-pandemic women of childbearing age.

Researchers said the results, in line with other studies, suggest that high levels of stress and disturbed sleep can affect the menstrual cycle.

Stress indirectly suppresses female body mechanisms by preventing the release of sex hormones, the researchers said.

The scientists plan to conduct the survey every six months to see if the disorder persists. They will also measure the participants’ blood pressure, weight, and sex hormone levels.

Dr. Michelle Maher, study author, said, “Our results underscore the real need to provide adequate medical care and psychological support to women affected by menstrual disorders, given the unprecedented psychological distress associated with the pandemic.

“This study was conducted at a relatively early stage in the Covid vaccination program, so the duration of the pandemic and the effectiveness of the vaccine may affect future results. Further research with objective, measurable data is needed.”

She added, “We encourage women with reproductive disorders – such as irregular, missed periods, painful or heavy periods, PMS or decreased sex drive – as well as mental disorders – including symptoms of bad mood, anxiety, stress and poor sleep – for advice ask your family doctor.

A separate study by Imperial College London monitors the menstrual cycles of 250 women before and after their Covid vaccination.

The lead researcher Dr. However, Victoria Male said the small number of participants means the study does not see a potential link unless it is “really common” – involving more than 1 in 10 women.

With one in ten women experiencing period problems every year, thorough research is needed to determine if vaccination is really to blame.

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