COVID levels in Boston wastewater triple in a week and increase sixfold in 14 days

Coronavirus levels detected in Boston sewage have tripled and six-fold in two weeks thanks to the Omicron-fueled COVID-19 wave that is rocking Massachusetts along with the rest of the nation.

The amount of trace amounts of virus in a given region’s sewage is used by experts to predict trends in the population’s upcoming COVID-19 cases.

The wastewater entering the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority’s Deer Island sewage treatment plant is being tested by Cambridge-based Biobot Analytics, Globus reports.

The current surge in traces of COVID-19 found in its sewage means the Boston area’s COVID-19 problems will get worse over the next week or so.

The amount of COVID-19 traces in Boston sewage tripled in a week and increased sixfold in two weeks amid the state’s Omicron surge

The amount of trace amounts of virus in a given region’s sewage is used by experts to predict trends in the population’s upcoming COVID-19 cases. Above is a graph showing the increase in traces of COVID-19 found in southern Boston sewage

This means that COVID-19 cases are expected to continue to rise in the Boston area for the next week or so. Above is a graph showing the increase in traces of COVID-19 in sewage in northern Boston

Massachusetts hit 15,238 on Jan. 1.  an all-time record for seven-day average COVID-19 cases

Massachusetts hit 15,238 on Jan. 1. an all-time record for seven-day average COVID-19 cases

The seven-day average of traces of virus in sewage from Boston’s southern area was a record-breaking 9,136 RNA copies / ml on December 30, according to MWRA. That’s three times as much as the 2,574 RNA copies / ml reported on December 23rd.

It’s also more than six times what it was two weeks earlier, on December 15, when the 7-day average was 1,367 RNA copies / ml. In the few months before that, the rate had fluctuated in the hundreds, but it wasn’t until December 1 that it topped 1,000 when it hit 1,136 RNA copies / ml – eight times less than it is now.

The samples could also reveal where the virus is being transmitted, as the northern area of ​​Boston has increased slightly less than the southern area. On December 29, the 7-day average of the virus traces was 6,987 RNA copies / ml and was thus almost three times as high as the 2,411 RNA copies / ml reported on December 23.

It was also five and a half times higher than on December 15, to 1,243 RNA copies / ml and seven and a half times the 929 RNA copies / ml on December 1.

Massachusetts saw a sharp increase in COVID-19 cases this month and on Jan.

The increase in traces of COVID-19 in wastewater entering the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority’s Deer Island sewage treatment plant (above) suggests that COVID-19 cases in the Boston area are only in the next week or so could increase even more

Cambridge-based Biobot Analytics is testing the wastewater and has said the amount of virus trace four to 10 days later in the Boston area correlates with COVID-19 cases

The number of newly confirmed COVID cases rose slightly on Friday and set another daily record with 22,703 cases.

The seven-day average has also increased exponentially, hitting an all-time record on Jan. 1 at 15,2398, an increase of about 50% over the 7,647 cases reported on December 25 and an increase of 62% over the 5,740 cases reported as of December 18 December corresponds to.

The latest Johns Hopkins University numbers, released on Sunday, show 115,984 new cases and 280 deaths in the past 24 hours, a lull in the previous days caused by slower numbers reporting over the weekend.

The U.S. hit a seven-day average of 402,998 cases on Sunday as the White House COVID Tsar, Dr, massive staff shortage.

Dr.  Anthony Fauci has suggested that Americans could be forced to test negative before exiting the newly shortened five-day virus quarantine as the country prepares for a massive staff shortage

Dr. Anthony Fauci has suggested that Americans could be forced to test negative before exiting the newly shortened five-day virus quarantine as the country prepares for a massive staff shortage

Fauci made his remarks in an ABC News interview on Sunday, days after the CDC halved the quarantine time for infected people from 10 to five days, for anyone who is asymptomatic or who has not had a fever for 24 hours.

He said, “You are right, there have been some concerns about why we are not asking people to get tested during this five day period. That is now being considered.

‘The CDC is well aware that there have been some setbacks in this regard. Looking back at it, there might be an option that testing could be a part of it. And I think we’ll hear more about this from the CDC in the next few days or so, ”said Fauci.

Fauci’s recent remarks have accused him of upset on COVID again, with conflicting advice given to Americans as cases soared and queues for tests lengthened. Travelers also saw another day of chaos at U.S. airports, with 2,409 flights across the country being canceled and a further 4,758 delayed on Sunday afternoon.

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